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Keeping board members engaged: One of the biggest challenges nonprofits face today

To provide the right governance, nonprofit board members need to be more productive, results-oriented and engaged, all while staying mission-focused and making a social impact. It’s a critical component to nonprofit financial sustainability and overall survival, which is your board’s charge.

To be truly motivated and effective, members of your board require a deep understanding of your charity’s work and mission; insight that goes beyond the intellectual and appeals to the heart.

Board members need to feel engaged with the nonprofit that they are supporting, or they lose interest. But, bringing on a valued board member is only the first step. Using the right methods to ensure that each board member becomes personally invested and engaged in the mission of the organization is key to board member retention.

Why should you think of your board members as "key" constituents?

In addition to leadership provided by the board, when truly engaged, board members will become your nonprofit's best ambassadors, advocates, strategists and all-around supporters.

Highly-engaged board members are your best peer-to-peer fundraisers. They know your nonprofit and they likely have a wide network of high net-worth friends, businesses and co-workers. Failure to keep members of your board informed and committed means you lose one of your best fundraising resources for major donations.

Why is strong board engagement so important to your nonprofit?

A strong program for nonprofit board member engagement will help your board members contribute more effectively to your organization through several avenues. Strong engagement facilitates communication, which is important and time-critical with budget and hiring approvals, for example. A well-thought-out engagement plan also allows your organization to learn from board member expertise through increased mutual collaboration and communication that will escalate your nonprofit’s reach and ability to achieve goals. And board turnover is reduced when members understand that their valuable time and contributions are making a difference and strengthens their commitment to your nonprofit mission.

How are you engaging your board members today?

Time is a limited resource and nonprofit board members respond to engagement efforts that respect that limit. Your nonprofit may do what every organization does: send a barrage of emails, followed by more emails, hold events that may have little participation due to unknown time constraints, mail out newsletters that are rarely read and more. These methods don't work and contribute to board attrition and lack of focus.

What is the right way to attract and retaining major donors? Engagement Communities™.

MissionBox-powered Engagement Communities™ provide one secure, branded online center for all of your major donors to access:

  • Information
  • Education
  • Minutes/Budgets
  • Reports
  • Inspirational Stories
  • Invites
  • Simple Surveys
  • Impact Reports
  • Shared Documents/Discussions
  • Internal News Feeds
  • Videos
  • Trainings and more …

Plus, MissionBox Engagement Communities provide easy document archival and retrieval, along with project and collaboration organization tools that promote true engagement with your major donors.

Best of all, you provide your major donors with “need to know” and appealing information, all accessed through your unique username and password in a guaranteed private, managed environment, available through any device, both desktop and mobile. With free user seats and cloud storage, you can invite a limitless number of board members to learn more, care more and give more to your charity.

MissionBox Engagement Communities.Your one-stop, secure, online center for all nonprofit constituent communications and collaboration. For a free demonstration, contact dhansen@missionbox.com.

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MissionBox editorial content is offered as guidance only, and is not meant, nor should it be construed as, a replacement for certified, professional expertise.

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